Just Folks: Andi Morrow

Guess who’s back (back back), back again? That’s right, it’s“Just Folks,” our series in which we talk to Southerners who have found their way to New York about where they’re from, where they are now, and what home means to them.

This week we have Andi Morrow. An actress, writer, and filmmaker from Huntsville, TN, Andi has lived in New York for four years now, along with her comedian husband, Drew, and their dog, Mick Jagger Pup. While she considers herself a “temporary guest” of the city, she loves what it has to offer, even if it does sometimes make her lonesome for nights in her mountain hometown, dancing under the full moon.

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Name:

Andi Morrow

Hometown:

Huntsville, Tennessee

Age:

29

Current City:

New York, New York

Who are you and what do you do?

I am an actress, writer, and filmmaker. I’m the founder of the NYC Lady Parts Film Club, a community that promotes and supports the work of women in the film industry. I grew up on a small farm in a very rural town in East Tennessee, so I’m most at home outdoors. I love to garden, play guitar, go camping, float down a river, and dance under full moons, and I love to make my own homemade natural tonics, elixirs, and beauty products inspired by my Appalachian heritage. I live in NYC with my husband, Drew Morgan, who is a stand-up comedian (also from the South — a very, very tiny place called Sunbright, TN) and our dog Mick Jagger Pup (#mickjaggerpup)!

Time North of the Mason-Dixon line so far?

4 years

What brought you to New York?

From a very young age, NYC had always been my dream. Drew and I are both in the entertainment industry, and this is where we need to be for our careers. Right after we got married, a personal tragedy struck Drew’s family, so we lived in Knoxville for a couple of years to be close to them. It wasn’t part of our plan, but now I’m glad we stayed in the South a little longer. The Knoxville artistic community is so welcoming, creative, and generous. During those two years, I got to explore my art in a way I probably wouldn’t have been able to if I had come to New York right away. It was really difficult to leave our Knoxville community, but we knew it was time.

What’s the most common reaction when people learn where you’re from? What’s something about life in the South that you have to explain to non-Southerners?

It’s usually fascination, which I really like. When I say I’m from Tennessee, most people respond with, “Oh wow, that’s cool!” I really love Tennessee, so it makes me happy that people find it interesting. A lot of people will try to talk about Nashville at first, so I’m up here spreading the good news about East Tennessee!

Describe life in NYC as people at home picture it. Describe life in NYC as it actually is.

I think people back home mostly picture a glamorous, fast-paced, and dangerous daily life. I am pretty busy, but I sleep a lot! I’m still a Southerner, so I like to move at a pretty slow pace. And I’ve never been in a situation where I felt unsafe. I think people forget that New York is home to lots and lots of families. They live in a giant city, yes, but there are still pockets of communities here.

Where do you consider home? Why?

I’m a bit of a wanderer, so “home” is an interesting word for me. But I think home will always be the house I grew up in, where my parents still live, in Huntsville. That house has been in my family for over 100 years. It’s full of my family’s history, and it will always be a part of who I am. I consider Knoxville home, too. I have a big community of friends and artists there, and I feel so at home in that city. Other than that, home is where my husband and pup are!

Do you miss where you’re from? Do you see yourself going back?

I do and I don’t. I miss a lot of things about the South: the community, the scenery, the laid-back atmosphere, the music, my family and friends. But there are things I don’t miss as well. There is this opposition to progress that seems to come with small-town life — an unwillingness to see or accept things any other way. That was always the disconnect for me with my hometown. And I don’t think this is necessarily exclusive to the South; I think a lot of small-town people perpetuate this attitude. I definitely will go back to the South one day, but I don’t think I’ll ever live in my hometown again. I want to be in a Southern city like Asheville or Knoxville. Those are my favorite places. And as an artist, I don’t think I could ever live somewhere again that didn’t have a big artistic community.

Do you consider yourself a Southerner? Do you consider yourself a New Yorker? Why or why not?

I’m Southern as shit! I come from Appalachia, so it’s a different kind of Southern. We are farmers, coal miners, and mountain people. I have a real connection to the mountains and the land. East Tennesseans have historically been very proud, independent, honest to a fault, hot-headed, and stubborn. I am 100% all of those things. I don’t consider myself a New Yorker at all. I’m just a temporary guest. I do really love the city, though, and all the things it provides. I’ve loved meeting people from all over the world, and I’ve found a lot of similarities between them and Southerners. Even on opposite sides of the world, we’ve all had common experiences. I love that.

Which food/drink/song/book/movie/artwork/quotation/gif/etc. defines New York for you?

The movie West Side Story was my first exposure to New York as a kid, which is really funny now that I think about it. The book Just Kids by Patti Smith had a huge impact on me and really solidified my desire to experience this city as an artist. And I don’t think anything has ever more perfectly summed up the NYC experience than the song “New York, I Love You” by LCD Soundsystem.

Which food/drink/song/book/movie/artwork/quotation/gif/etc. defines where you’re from?

Music is the heart of the South, in my opinion. East Tennessee is definitely best-represented through old-time mountain music: Southern gospels, bluegrass, and old-school country. Dolly Parton’s “Early Morning Breeze” is my go-to song when I’m feeling homesick. Waylon Jennings perfectly represents the Southern “give no shits, do what I want” attitude. Sturgill Simpson is the leading voice for this new Southern era. He speaks for a lot of us who love the South so deeply, but have always felt a little out of place there at the same time. There are so many Southern writers I love, but the short story “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker has always really resonated personally with me. It’s told from an African-American perspective, but the themes of abandoning and honoring heritage is something a lot of Southerners of all races can relate to. And then the Bitter Southerner is my favorite current publication. They are doing some really amazing things for this New South movement that’s being ushered in.

What is the best cure for homesickness?

Hanging out with my Southern friends who are in the city! Works every time. If i’m really bad off, I’ll take a trip upstate or somewhere else out of the city. Seeing some green landscape always helps.

Bagels or biscuits?

BISCUITS, DUH!

Want to learn more about Andi and follow her New York adventures?  You can find her on Instagram, on Twitter, and at her website, andimorrow.com.

Just Folks: Casey Kreher

Mondays on Zelda & Scout are all about you! In a series we call “Just Folks,” we talk to Southerners who have found their way to New York about where they’re from, where they are now, and what home means to them.

This week we have Casey Kreher! Without this transplant from Georgia, Scout never would have found her favorite neighborhood beer spot. Always ready with a smile and a “hey y’all,” Casey’s a “here for now “guy. The summer rains of Georgia are constantly calling him home. 

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Pictured with lovely human and fellow Just Folks profilee Joanna Futral #BushwickPowerCouple

Name:

Casey Kreher

Hometown:

Snellville, Georgia

Age:

34

Current City:

Brooklyn, New York

Who are you and what do you do?

Beer wrangler, sound engineer, re-budding musician.

Time North of the Mason-Dixon line so far?

1 year and 9 months

What brought you to New York?

A girl. I moved here to be with (fellow Just Folks profilee) Joanna, who moved up here for her dance career.

What’s the most common reaction when people learn where you’re from? What’s something about life in the South that you have to explain to non-Southerners?

Bemused disbelief. Most people think Southerners are yokels, so to meet someone who’s not shouting out Lynyrd Skynyrd lyrics 24/7 is hard for them to understand. Also grits — people always ask, “What are grits?” And everyone always wants to talk about racism and whether or not it’s worse down south — the sad fact is that it’s always bad, wherever you are.

Describe life in NYC as people at home picture it. Describe life in NYC as it actually is.

They either think everyone up here is dressed really, really well, or they think they’re just complete vagrants. Which is somewhat accurate: People in New York definitely dress a level up from home.

Where do you consider home? Why?

I no longer have a house anywhere that I would consider home, but I definitely feel like I am in the right place when I’m in Georgia. I don’t necessarily feel like I’m visiting here…but I don’t really feel like I belong.

Do you miss where you’re from? Do you see yourself going back?

Yes, absolutely. I was down in Georgia a couple weeks ago and we had one of those summer afternoon rainstorms, and that made me miss Georgia more than anything recently. So yes, I will absolutely go back.

Do you consider yourself a Southerner? Do you consider yourself a New Yorker? Why or why not?

I definitely consider myself a Southerner in New York. Like I said, I don’t necessarily feel unwelcome here, but I also don’t really feel like I belong.

Which food/drink/song/book/movie/artwork/quotation/gif/etc. defines New York for you?

The quintessential New York thing for me is the “I heart New York” logo. It sort of represents everything about New York simultaneously: it’s ubiquitous, it’s in your face, and the more you see it the more you realize it doesn’t actually mean anything, except the meaning that you give it yourself.

Also Brooklyn Lager…it’s one of the iconic beers around here, but it’s no where near the best. There’s so much stuff here that’s supposed to be “the best,” but it’s just a lot of everything all at once, and a lot of mediocre stuff gets mass produced.

Which food/drink/song/book/movie/artwork/quotation/gif/etc. defines where you’re from?

Anytime I see a bottle of Coke I think of Atlanta. So Coca-Cola, definitely.

What is the best cure for homesickness?

I made friends with a guy at a restaurant who does real good things with simple food, and that was such a hallmark of Atlanta for me. Simple, but good.

Bagels or biscuits?

Bagels in New York, biscuits in Georgia.

Just Folks: Kendra Ralston

Mondays on Zelda & Scout are all about you! In a series we call “Just Folks,” we talk to Southerners who have found their way to New York about where they’re from, where they are now, and what home means to them.

This week we have Kendra Ralston! This Kentucky gal wouldn’t exactly call herself a Southerner. But when she does find herself missing the grits and cornbread of home, she dances it out.

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Name:

Kendra Ralston

Hometown:

Louisville, Kentucky

Age:

26

Current City:

Brooklyn, New York

Who are you and what do you do?

I’m a content editor at The New York Public Library. I get to read, write, and edit for a living, and I work inside one of the most beautiful buildings in the city. I’d have to say I’m living the dream so far.

I’m also a semi-professional dancer with Baila Society, and I occasionally do aerial hoop. Joining the circus is a new life goal.

Time North of the Mason-Dixon line so far?

8 years (including 4 in Massachusetts for college)

What brought you to New York?

I wanted to pursue book publishing after I graduated college, so I moved here without much of a plan besides finding a job in that industry. I wound up at Google, then I fell into marketing. Through a series of crazy events, I finally wound up doing what I love.

What’s the most common reaction when people learn where you’re from? What’s something about life in the South that you have to explain to non-Southerners?

Typically, “You don’t have an accent!” or “I’ve never met anyone from Kentucky before.”

People seem to think of Kentucky as all hills, farms, horses, and KFC. They’re usually surprised when I explain that it has a lot more to it than that.

Describe life in NYC as people at home picture it. Describe life in NYC as it actually is.

Imaginary: Gossip Girl, all day every day.

Real life: dirty, smelly, fast-paced, aggressive, ride or die.

Where do you consider home? Why?

That’s a tough question, but I’d have to say New York for right now. I’ve managed to surround myself with an incredible group of people who’ve been there for me at my best and worst, and they’ve become home to me.

Do you miss where you’re from? Do you see yourself going back?

Sometimes, but I don’t see myself going back.

Do you consider yourself a Southerner? Do you consider yourself a New Yorker? Why or why not?

Is Louisville that Southern? I don’t think I’d consider myself a Southerner.

I can’t say I’m a New Yorker either, but I’ve definitely developed a thicker skin by being here. I’ve struggled a lot since moving to New York, but I’ve come out stronger because of it.

Which food/drink/song/book/movie/artwork/quotation/gif/etc. defines New York for you?

Food: dollar pizza, black and white cookies

Art: Edward Hopper, “Nighthawks.” It reminds me of the loneliness that can come from being in a saturated city like New York, while still not feeling completely alone.

Which food/drink/song/book/movie/artwork/quotation/gif/etc. defines where you’re from?

Music: Claude Debussy, “Clair de Lune

Food: grits, pancakes, and cornbread

What is the best cure for homesickness?

Usually (always?) dancing.

Bagels or biscuits?

Biscuits.

Just Folks: Caroline Bologna

Mondays on Zelda & Scout are all about you! In a series we call “Just Folks,” we talk to Southerners who have found their way to New York about where they’re from, where they are now, and what home means to them.

This week we have Caroline Bologna. As a writer and editor extraordinaire (in Zelda’s (entirely biased) opinion, having spent many a late night editing a college magazine together), Caroline always knew New York was the logical choice for her. But she’ll forever be a New Orleans gal at heart — the kind that “drinks at funerals” and is bursting with pride for her hometown.

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Name:

Caroline Bologna

Hometown:

New Orleans, Louisiana

Age:

24

Current City:

Brooklyn, New York

Who are you and what do you do?

I’m an associate editor at The Huffington Post. I always knew I wanted to write for a living, and I feel so lucky to have landed such an incredible job right out of college. I publish about 3-5 short pieces every day. Beyond work, I love to explore the New York food scene and try as many desserts as possible.

Time North of the Mason-Dixon line so far?

1 year

What brought you to New York?

I tend to joke that I just follow my older siblings wherever they go. My sister has lived in New York for 10 years, and my brother’s been here for 4 years. New York is also the go-to city for editorial work, so it was kind of a no-brainer that I would end up here.

What’s the most common reaction when people learn where you’re from? What’s something about life in the South that you have to explain to non-Southerners?

A lot of people say, “But you don’t have an accent!” I have to explain that a lot of people from NOLA just don’t have accents — though there is the yat accent, and most of my friends who went to big Southern state schools for college came back with a little twang. I also have to explain the debutante culture behind Mardi Gras, which most people from outside New Orleans don’t seem to know anything about.

Describe life in NYC as people at home picture it. Describe life in NYC as it actually is.

I think they picture me living some sort of fabulous, Manolo-filled, Carrie Bradshaw life. In reality, life in New York means spending a ton of time walking around outside (so high heels just won’t cut it for me).

Where do you consider home? Why?

New Orleans will always be home. There’s a lot of pride in being a New Orleanian, particularly for people who lived through Katrina. NOLA is a city that is truly unlike any other — the music, the food, the art, the people, everything is unique. And I couldn’t be more proud to have grown up there.

Do you miss where you’re from? Do you see yourself going back?

I definitely miss it sometimes, though I don’t see myself moving back any time in the near future. Still, I wouldn’t rule it out as a “never” for later on.

There’s this famous quote by a local journalist named Chris Rose that a lot of people like to reference: “She is a New Orleans girl, and New Orleans girls never live anywhere else, and even if they do, they always come back. That’s just the way it is.”

Do you consider yourself a Southerner? Do you consider yourself a New Yorker? Why or why not?

I consider myself more a Southerner than a New Yorker. Where I’m from will always be part of my identity. And I’ll never stop saying “y’all.”

Which food/drink/song/book/movie/artwork/quotation/gif/etc. defines New York for you?

Food: 99-cent pizza, soup dumplings, Shake Shack, Dominique Ansel treats, artisanal donuts, Momofuku birthday cake truffles

Songs: “You Go Down Smooth” by Lake Street Dive, “So Sleepy” by Fiona Apple, and Tove Lo‘s whole “Queen of the Clouds” album

Art: Peter Max’s Statue of Liberty series

Which food/drink/song/book/movie/artwork/quotation/gif/etc. defines where you’re from?

Food: jambalaya, crawfish monica, oysters Rockefeller, sno-balls, and anything from Galatoire’s, Mother’s, or Sucre

Songs: “A Lifetime” by Better Than Ezra and “They All Ask’d for You” by The Meters

Book: A Confederacy of Dunces

Quotes: “There are a lot of places I like, but I like New Orleans better.” — Bob Dylan

“We dance even if there’s no radio. We drink at funerals. We talk too much and laugh too loud and live too large and, frankly, we’re suspicious of others who don’t.” — Chris Rose

What is the best cure for homesickness?

Calling my mom while making the long walk to the L train.

Bagels or biscuits?

Biscuits.

May Playlist: I Want to Be a Part of It

Music has a unique power to define a place or time for us, providing a soundtrack to a certain period in our lives or a place we used to know. There are bands and songs that take us back to childhood car rides or high school dances, late nights in a dorm room or unpacking boxes in a new apartment, the cobblestone streets of Prague and a certain rocky beach in the south of France. And so when we were coming up with the questions for our Just Folks questionnaire, we knew we wanted to ask people about the songs that held meaning for them. New York makes a lot of appearances in lyrics or titles, so some of the associations were easy — Zelda loves “On Broadway,” Scout has a soft spot for Billy Joel, we both know all the words to “NYC”— but we wanted to know about the more personal connections. Which songs define your New York? Here’s what you said.

Thank You, Lord, for Sending Me the F Train: Mike DoughtySarah Sheppard, from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. “The longer I live in Brooklyn, the more this song makes sense.”

Jazz (We’ve Got)A Tribe Called QuestKatie Beth White, from Louisville, Kentucky.

I and Love and You: The Avett BrothersStephanie Walker, from Austin, Texas. “It makes me think of New York mostly because the lyrics are literally ‘Brooklyn, Brooklyn, take me in,’ but I also really identify with the references to the sacrifices one sometimes makes in moving here and trying to make it work. The things you miss but also the things you want to move on from.”

Money: John Kander and Fred Ebb (from Cabaret) – Candace Bryan, from Memphis, Tennessee.

So Far Around The Bend: The NationalAnita Badejo, from Mountain Home, Arkansas (via Lubbock, Texas via Debrecen, Hungary). “I’ve always listened to this song when flying back to NYC. The line ‘There is no leaving New York,’ slays me.”

Rhapsody in Blue: George GershwinJohn Corrales, from Odessa, Texas.

New York: The Milk Carton KidsJennifer Harlan, from Louisville, Kentucky. “It’s slow and it’s sweet and it’s sad. It’ll break your heart but it’s also beautiful, and you can’t seem to tear yourself away.”

The entire soundtrack to When Harry Met Sally: Harry Connick, Jr. – Mary Lane Haskell, from Oxford, Mississippi.

Empire State of Mind: Jay-Z feat. Alicia KeysJoanna Futral, from Atlanta, Georgia and Katherine Hurt, from Pikeville, Kentucky. “It came out the year I moved to New York, so that’s my jam. It makes me emotional every time I hear it.”

Bright Lights Bigger City: Cee Lo GreenPatrick Cox, from Lebanon, Kentucky.

Working For the MTA: Justin Townes EarleLuke, from Sevierville, Tennessee. “We saw him at City Winery during my early days here; plus, like me, he very much identifies with Tennessee and moving to New York from there.”

Do My Thing: Estelle feat. Janelle MonáeCourtney Towner, from Amarillo, Texas.

Street Trash: HuntersKatie Levy, from Louisville, Kentucky. “Not because of the lyrics or anything, just the sound.”

Famous Flower of Manhattan: The Avett BrothersKatie Warden, from Deland, Florida, and Kelsey Goldman, from Louisville, Kentucky. “I think I always connected with the narrative — that a little bit of beauty and nature could exist anywhere, even between the cracks of Manhattan concrete.”

As always, you can listen along here, or we’re on YouTube and Spotify.

Just Folks: Louisvillians on Derby

So we’re just over halfway through our make-shift Derby Festival here on Zelda & Scout, and as a blog about displacement and diaspora, we wanted to focus a couple of days on how to celebrate Derby when you’re far away from Churchill Downs (as we so often are…sigh).

The stars aren’t always in alignment for us: Not every year brings a big, flowery party to attend. Scout had to work last year and thus was only able to help Zelda with preparations in the morning (no worries though — many floral-dressed, fascinator-donning selfies were taken to commemorate our short-lived celebration). We’ve both had Derby’s in foreign countries (Zelda had two in France; Scout had one in the Czech Republic). We both had thrown together dorm room celebrations, huddled over a laptop. Scout spent her first two college Derby Days nursing post-Spring Fest hangovers. Zelda spent her sophomore one in a recording booth with her a cappella group.

Scout and Zelda at Derby celebrations gone by

Scout and Zelda at Derby celebrations gone by

But wherever we are, we always find a way to sit down and remember our old Kentucky home for at least a few minutes. There are a lot of ways to celebrate, and we’re of the opinion that there is no wrong way to get your Derby on (obviously we’d prefer the all out party with juleps and hats and bluegrass music, but we understand that’s not a possibility for everyone).

So we decided to turn to our displaced Louisville brethren to see how they fête the special day. Our super formal and official survey revealed a few things.

Some people go home, and that seems to be the pipe dream for those who do not. Everyone is agreed: Nothing matches the experience of actually being beneath the Twin Spires with 200,000 of your peeps. One Louisville gal’s parents even go so far as to leave her a voicemail every year of the crowd singing “My Old Kentucky Home,” so she feels like part of the day, even when she finds herself at work.

But that’s not to say being away from the Bluegrass stops people from partying their faces off. Some people (us included) throw their own shindigs, and get their kicks from showing them Yankees how it’s done.

Brother Jimmy's, awaiting Derby spectators

Brother Jimmy’s, awaiting Derby spectators

Others get their party on at various New York establishments. We’ve compiled our own guide to NYC Derby Fests, coming your way tomorrow, but our fellow Louisvillians’ favorites range from the classy (Union League Club, very Lilly Pulitzer and traditional) to the more down home (favorites include Brother Jimmy’s on the Upper West Side, Distilled in Tribeca, and the Red Rooster in Harlem).

Louisvillians had a few other tips for making the most of Derby day. One suggested New York stalwart Goorin Brothers for hats. Another suggested Forever 21, if you’re in need of a quick and affordable millinery fix. And everyone seems to agree that watching Brooklyn hipsters try mint juleps for the first time, and then proceed to make faces and complain about how they “thought it would be like a mojito,” is highly entertaining if you approach it with a heaping tablespoon of irony (this is Brooklyn, after all).

Near or far, whether alone with our laptops and bottle of Bulleit or surrounded by friends, we Kentuckians are a proud bunch. Sometimes certain characters from our dear state make us cringe, some days the jokes about kissin’ cousins or fried chicken get old, but in May there’s no place we’d rather call home than the Bluegrass State. And nobody, not one of us, can sing “My Old Kentucky Home” without a tear coming to his or her eye. Cheers to that.

Just Folks: Joanna Futral

Mondays on Zelda & Scout are all about you! In a series we call “Just Folks,” we talk to Southerners who have found their way to New York about where they’re from, where they are now, and what home means to them. Want to be next? Fill out our questionnaire here!

This week we have Joanna Futral. This dancer may hail from the land of Scarlett O’Hara, but she has pirouetted between North and South her entire life. Bagels, biscuits and almond croissants, she finds something to love everywhere she goes. 

Joanna Frutal

Name:

Joanna Futral

Hometown:

Atlanta, GA

Age:

28

Current City:

Brooklyn, NY

Who are you and what do you do?

I spend a lot of time doing administrative tasks for two dance companies I work for: applying for shows, updating our website, sending out eblasts, marketing, and general upkeep. I also dance for one group right now, make my own dances, and tutor 3rd-11th graders in math.

Time North of the Mason-Dixon line so far?

14 years

What brought you to New York?

Dance, so I could challenge myself as an artist.

What’s the most common reaction when people learn where you’re from? What’s something about life in the South that you have to explain to non-Southerners?

They usually ask why I don’t have a Southern accent; then I tell them I lived in Maine for 7 years (1st through 10th grade). Or they ask about what grits are.

I usually have to explain what a debutante ball is, and what that culture is like. Also my brainwashed love for Chick-fil-A and Coca-Cola.

Describe life in NYC as people at home picture it. Describe life in NYC as it actually is.

They either think that it’s super flashy, busy, and exciting…or they think it’s dirty, congested, and full of economic disparity.

It’s all of it, all the time, but mostly it’s just exhausting.

Where do you consider home? Why?

Yikes, well as I write this I’m actually in Atlanta for a week, and it’s taken until Day 4 for Atlanta to feel like home again. When I first got here, I felt super anxious and ready to go back to New York, but now I’ve started remembering more stories and how it used to feel good to live here, too.

Do you miss where you’re from? Do you see yourself going back?

I do, but I love New York right now. I feel challenged in ways I never would have guessed. I feel braver about challenging my own social norms that I’ve just accepted over the years. I don’t feel as scared to do something different, but I’m definitely more aware of my fears, too.

But my boyfriend’s parents and my parents both live in Georgia, so yes, we’ll definitely move back to be closer to them.

Do you consider yourself a Southerner? Do you consider yourself a New Yorker? Why or why not?

I feel like both: Southern, because I love biscuits, and Northern, because I love almond croissants.

But Atlanta is becoming super gentrified, so they’ll probably get almond croissants soon.

Which food/drink/song/book/movie/artwork/quotation/gif/etc. defines New York for you?

Well, first off, almond croissants. Also bagels, espresso, Piet Mondrian, Amy Poehler, that concrete jungle song, and “Newsies.”

Which food/drink/song/book/movie/artwork/quotation/gif/etc. defines where you’re from?

Biscuits, Coke-A-Cola [sic], drip coffee (but we would just call it coffee), A Man in Full, Gone with the Wind, and “Georgia on My Mind.”

What is the best cure for homesickness?

Calling my parents and friends. Then lots of dessert/popcorn and “Parks and Rec.”

Bagels or biscuits?

mind exploded.