Thankful

It goes without saying that 2016 has been a bit of a year. From shootings and refugee crises and legends lost to the festering dumpster fire that was this year’s presidential election, there is no shortage of doom and gloom around us. Even in this season of twinkly lights and cocoa, it can be hard to muster up much good cheer after a year this heartbreaking, soul-crushing, utterly devastating in so many ways. I began last week thinking 2016 had dealt us all the bad cards we could take (and then some), hoping to finish up the year with holiday festivities and the quiet hope that somehow next year would be better. And then, I sprained my ankle.

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I am no stranger to injuries of the pedal variety. In college, I managed to break my foot not once but twice, losing two whole semesters to crutches and casts and physical therapy appointments. So when, as I have done too many times before, I tripped on some stairs last Tuesday, my overwhelming feeling — other than the searing pain at my insole — was anger. I was mad at myself, for somehow managing to do this yet again. I was mad at my feet and their seeming inability to remain in one piece for more than 5 years at a time. And I was mad, so mad, at 2016, for delivering yet another kick when I was already so far down.

But here’s the thing: As I lay on my couch these past few days, a bag of frozen mango chunks on my foot, drowsy from pain meds and hydrating like it was my job, slowly that rage began to be supplanted by another feeling: gratitude.

In spite of everything and against all odds, I am thankful.

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I’m thankful to have a job with paid sick days, and a boss who was incredibly nice and accommodating and gave me the time I needed to heal.

I’m thankful to work with a group of incredibly kind, smart, and passionate colleagues, whose hearts are always in the right place. I’m thankful for all the emails and texts and snaps they sent me while I was gone.

I’m thankful for my roommates, who picked up prescriptions and made me dinner and watched infinite Christmas movies with me while I convalesced.

I’m thankful for my friends who surrounded me with love and support, offering help and food and puppy gifs to get me through the week. I’m thankful for the ones who gave me hugs, who texted, who brought me meatballs and cookies and refills so I could spend my apartment’s holiday party holding court on the couch. I’m thankful they slowed their steps to match my limps so I wouldn’t have to walk alone.

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I’m thankful for my family, who are always there for me no matter the geographic distances. I’m grateful for Skype and Facetime and bitmoji, which make the miles not seem quite as long. I’m thankful I’ll get to hug them in person in a few days.

I’m thankful for candy cane Hershey kisses and Seamless delivery people and Good Earth tea (now available online again!).

And I am thankful for art.

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I’m thankful for the ways artists of every media have helped me make some sense out of this truly surreal year. I’m thankful for the escape it offers, the comfort it provides, the conversations it sparks — how it keeps expanding the definition of humanity. And most of all, I’m thankful for the way it inspires hope. When countries and families — and ligaments — are being torn asunder and it seems that the forces of darkness have won, the best art inspires me to look for the light.

Five Golden Rules for Surviving the Holiday Season

Happy holidays, y’all! The great festive season is upon us, bursting with trees and carols and tinsel and mistletoe. It’s a truly wonderful time. But you know what isn’t so wonderful? The overwhelming stress, anxiety, and exhaustion that can result from trying to contend with the social demands of the Yuletide period. This season is not for amateurs, and it’s easy to be swept away by the great tide of happy hours, cocktail parties, festive outings, and more that crash into one’s Facebook come December 1st. Whether you’re an extroverted holiday lover like Zelda, or a more gathering averse but equally festive introvert like Scout, December can be a lot. So we teamed up with Casper and pooled our mental resources to come up with five golden rings rules to get you through the next few weeks relatively unscathed — with your social circle, Christmas spirit, and mental health intact.

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1. Plan ahead. The key to avoiding holiday-festivity-overload is to make a list, check it twice, and stick to it. Whether you go digital or hard copy is up to your personal preferences, but either way you need to get organized. And make sure you take into account transit between events. In an ideal world, your itinerary would start with the event farthest from your home and proceed in an orderly fashion, closer and closer to your bed. If this isn’t possible, assemble a team of rogues to travel with, for solidarity and to lessen the inevitable pain of shelling out for an end-of-night Uber.

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2. Prioritize. Even the most well-organized social butterfly will not be able to attend every function, gift exchange, and ice skating foray of the month. It’s okay to excuse yourself from that one ugly sweater party you know you don’t have the outfit for anyway. Pick the ones that you care most about, with the people you care most about, and be ok with that. (We made this post instead of our regularly scheduled All the Fixin’s, because we prioritized our own time this week. Trying to lead by example and all that). And pro tip: Try to stack the events you’re most interested in (or the ones hosted by those nearest and dearest to you) earlier in your day/evening, when you’re less likely to bail because of exhaustion.

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3. Pre-stock your bar. Let’s face it, all this socializing and carrying on and spending time with your family is going to require libations. So before your holiday season gets into full swing, buy a case of wine for hostess gifts and a fifth of bourbon (or other preferred liquor) for your flask. You’ll make it through. (Pro tip number two: Liquor and wine also make great last-minute gifts for any friends, acquaintances, or co-workers (of legal drinking age) who spring the dreaded “Here, I got you something!” on your unprepared self. We also recommend picking up a pack of stick-on bows; they work wonders when transforming any item in your household into a seasonal present.)

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4. Don’t be a mooch. That’s right, y’all, we said hostess gifts. If your mama raised you right, you know that it is rude to show up unprepared. Your hosts have invited you into their homes, decked their halls, gone to the trouble of preparing food and beverages (or at the very least an appropriate playlist). Bring a bottle of something boozy, or a festive treat (or if you’re going for extra credit, check out one of the items on Zelda’s 2016 Gift Guide!). Don’t make the ghost of Emily Post past haunt your ass: She will (she was a badass). And she’ll make you send her a “Thank you” note within a week of said haunting. Manners matter, children.

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5. Make time for me-time. Last but not least, make like the bears and be sure you hibernate a little this winter. Even the most extroverted of extroverts needs time to rest and recharge. The holiday season is a marathon, people, and there’s no way you’re going to be at your merriest and brightest if you’re running on zero sleep and too much mulled wine. Weekends packed full of parties? Set aside some weeknights to regroup. Weeknights full of office parties and gift exchanges? Reserve at least one weekend night this month for you, yourself, and some cozy fun.  And for maximum relaxation, allow us to suggest the above checklist! Pour yourself some cocoa, get under the covers, and turn on your favorite holiday classic (top of our list is White Christmas, guaranteed to chase all your humbugs away). There’s nothing like a pillow fort for a long winter’s nap.

Holiday Cocktails Three Ways

December is upon us, which means we are in the season of holiday parties and cocktails. Let’s be honest: Our real talent lies in drinking, and the holidays are when we really put thos skills to the test. Come December, you can find us throwing back festive libations at parties and pop-ups and bars, especially those that take the holiday spirit to a scale only possible in New York (see Rolf’s, below). But if you can’t make it to such a Christmas Mecca for your holiday cocktail fix, Zelda and Scout are here for you.

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First, eggnog. Like its October counterpart, pumpkin spice, it is divisive. Its milky goodness is not for everyone, but those who do love it love it a lot. I am one of those people — a Noghead, if you will — and really the only thing that makes this drink better is the addition of alcohol. If you want to get fancier than the sweet and simple classic, Southern Comfort Eggnog + Southern Comfort Whiskey (the only way to drink nog, according to friend of the blog Jason), see below:

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Salted Caramel Eggnog from The Cookie Rookie: This is one for the more ambitious in the kitchen (the Zeldas rather than the Scouts, if you will). You have to make the eggnog from scratch, see, which surpasses my three-step recipe limit. In a large saucepan, combine 3 cups whole milk, 1 cup heavy whipping cream, 4 cinnamon sticks, 3/4 tablespoon vanilla extract, and 1 teaspoon grated nutmeg, and bring to a boil over medium heat. As soon as the mixture starts to bubble, remove from heat and allow it to steep and cool for 5-10 minutes. While it’s brewing, in a stand mixer, beat five eggs and 2/3 cup sugar until fully combined. Pour your egg mixture into  your milk mixture and whisk together. Add 1/2 cup caramel syrup, 1 tablespoon sea salt, and 3/4 cups dark rum. Garnish with caramel and more nutmeg if you’re feeling fancy.

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Next up, milk punch. Bourbon Milk Punch is a traditional holiday drink throughout the Deep South, but especially in New Orleans. The drink dates back all the way to at least the 19th century, when it was featured in 1862’s How to Mix Drinks, perhaps the very first cocktail recipe book. This recipe from Arnaud’s French 75 bar seems to be the internet-accepted classic version of this cocktail, featured by the New York Times and Garden and Gun alike. Pour 1¼ oz bourbon (or, if you prefer, brandy), ½ oz dark rum, 2 oz whole milk or half-and-half, ¾ tsp vanilla extract, and ½ oz simple syrup into a cocktail shaker filled three-quarters full with ice. Shake until chilled (roughly 30 seconds). Strain into a rocks glass and dust with grated nutmeg.

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Finally, for the clear alcohol connoisseurs, we have a seasonal twist on a classic — an Apple Cider Mule. This drink. from Pretty Plain Janes, swaps the summery lime flavors of the typical Moscow Mule for wintry notes of apple and spice. In a copper mug full of ice, as is traditional, mix 1 1/5 oz of vodka (this recipe suggests caramel-flavored liquor, but you do you) and 3 oz apple cider,. Top off with ginger beer, and garnish with apple slices and cinnamon sticks.

Photos via: The Cookie Rookie, Johnny Autry, Pretty Plain Janes

Zelda’s 2016 Holiday Gift Guide

It’s that time of year again, y’all! The gifting season is upon us, a time of secret santas and white elephants and wrapping paper galore. I love to gift: Nothing gives me quite the same thrill as finding the perfect present for a particular person, the perfect blend of thoughtful and fun and unique all wrapped up in a bow. But whether you love to gift or find it an onerous challenge (see: Scout), a little inspiration and brainstorming help never hurts. These are some of the things I’ve found on the internet lately that tickled my fancy. Whether you buy them for a friend, a family member, a coworker, or yourself, they’re all sure to bring a little joy and sparkle to your day.

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For the one with more books than bookshelves: Strand Grey Beanie (Strand Books, $14.95)

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For the one who loves a good color-coordinated binder: Leslie Knope Tote Bag (Etsy – HommeSurLaLune, $20)

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For the one with the well-stocked bar cart: The Cocktail Deck (Etsy – loveandvictory,  $16)

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For the one who, like, really wants to get into mixology this year: Tall Bartending Glasses (Kikkerland, $25)

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For the one who’d rather be in Stars Hollow: I’m With Lorelai Tee (Rachel Antonoff, $45. Also available in Rory!)

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For the one who is attracted to pie, but doesn’t want to date pie: Foods of Gilmore Girls Print (Etsy – roaringsoftly, $12-22)

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For the one who’s too good for Starbucks: Southern Coffee Holiday Sampler (StyleBlueprint + Batch, $39)

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For the one whose favorite time of day is No Pants O’Clock: Beloved Bedtime Reading Robe in Polar Frolic (ModCloth, $32.99)

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For the one who’s still a nasty woman: Wild Feminist Sweatshirt (Wildfang, $50)

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For the one who could use a little pick-me-up: Brave Enough by Cheryl Strayed (Amazon, $10.12)

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For the who has a way with words: Punderdome: A Card Game for Pun Lovers (Amazon, $13.13)

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For the one who’s trying to channel his/her 2016 rage into something productive: Write Like a Motherfucker Mug (The Rumpus,  $15)

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For the one who can’t even keep a succulent alive: Tiny Terrarium Trinket Dish (Leif Shop, $8)

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For the one whose apartment is a life-size Pinterest board: Wood and Marble Hexagon Coaster Set (Leif Shop, $38)

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For the one who’s basically a beauty guru: Sephora Collection Face Mask Set (Sephora, $25)

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For the one who’s always the hostess: Gilded Greetings Cheese Board (Anthropologie, $58)

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For the one who’s always on the go: Ceramic Skyline Trinket Dish (Anthropologie, $14)

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For the one who knows what’s up: Kentucky Kicks Ass Sweatshirt (Kentucky for Kentucky, $50)

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For the one whose brunch game is on point: Bitter Southerner Short Stack Cookbooks (Bitter Southerner General Store, $14 or $38 for set)

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For the one who won’t stop talking about Great British Bake-Off: Retro Mixer Ornaments Set (World Market, $20.97)

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For the one who’s flawless: I Woke Up Like This Mug (Etsy – DeLuceDesign, $18.99)

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For the one after our own hearts: Just One Kind Print (The Old Try, $42)

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For the one who wants to find some hope in this dumpster fire of a year: a donation to the charity of your choice (Some suggestions: ACLU, Planned Parenthood, Everytown for Gun Safety, The Trevor Project, NextGen Climate Action, Council on American-Islamic Relations, The UN Refugee Agency)

all images via retailer. last image via pinterest.

Southern Spookery

It’s that time of year again, when we embrace all the cobwebs, adorn our homes with skeletons and decorative gourds, and channel our inner granny witches. That’s right, the spooky season is upon us, and in celebration we thought we’d tell you about some Halloween-appropriate Southern men, women and monsters. The South is known for its many storytelling traditions, as well as its inherent spookiness, so it’s no surprise that the two should combine into some scary folktales and stories. Scout’s been bookmarking spooky Southern tales for the past couple months (thanks, Lore!) just to bring them to you in this most ghoulish of holiday seasons. The four creatures that follow are all purported to be real by some party or another. We may be skeptical, but where’s the fun in that? So put on this playlist, paint the ceiling of your porch blue, turn down the lights, and settle in for some good old-fashioned ghost stories.

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Rawhead and Bloody Bones: Many Southern ghost stories and folklore come from African traditions and culture, but while some connect this particular tale to the Gullah culture, it’s more likely a story brought over from England and adopted by multiple local cultures. Rawhead and Bloody Bones are both bogeyman figures meant to put fear into children and induce good behavior. Whatever the origins, Rawhead, a skull stripped of skin, and his companion Bloody Bones, a headless skeleton, prowl the night looking for misbehaved children. Sometimes they’re said to live near water, sometimes in dark dank cupboards under stairs or sinks. 

The story dates back as far as the early 1500s and is mentioned in sermons, stories and nursery rhymes: Rawhead and Bloody Bones / Steals Naughty Children from their Homes/Takes them to his dirty den/ And they are never seen again. Seems like good motivation for good behavior. also, fun fact: The monsters are the subject of a song by the post-punk band Siouxsie and the Banshees

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Fouke Monster: Also known as the Southern Sasquatch, the Fouke Monster is the most well-established of the many Southern cryptid (aka a creature whose actual existence is not yet proven) hominids. Somewhere between seven and ten feet tall and weighing between 300 and 800 pounds, the monster was first spotted in the early 1970s. It runs with an arm-swinging gallop and has bright red eyes the size of silver dollars. In 1971, the monster apparently attacked Bobby and Elizabeth Ford in their new Arkansas home. The creature was then allegedly spotted crossing a nearby highway, and supposed footprints were found at a nearby filling station. Sightings died down in the later part of the decade, but the monster resurfaced in the late 90s and sightings continue to occur.

The Fouke Monster is just one of many Bigfoot-like creatures that roam the American South. In Fort Worth, Texas, there’s the Lake Worth Monster. Described as a “fishy goat-man” in a 1969 local headline, the creature is supposedly half-man, half-goat and covered in scales. South Carolina has the Lizard Man of Scape Ore Swamp, and Louisiana has the seven-foot-tall, web-toed Honey Island Swamp Monster.

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The Bell Witch: In the early 19th century, the Bell family of Adams, Tennessee, a small town just a ten-minute drive from the Kentucky border, claimed to be haunted and cursed by a poltergeist named Kate. The inciting incident was an encounter with a chimerical animal with the body of a dog and the head of rabbit. For days after this event, the Bell family’s nights were disrupted by pounding on the exterior of their home, the source of which could never be found. Eventually, the banging and clanging started coming from inside the house (dun dun dun…). Scratching on walls and slamming doors were accompanied by strange whispers and objects moving of their own accord.

The Bell’s youngest daughter, Betsy, was a particular target of the spirit. She was said to have been slapped and had her hair pulled by the specter. The whispers grew into discernible voices singing hymns and quoting scripture. Stories of the Bell Witch spread so far that future president Andrew Jackson came to investigate. One of his men was apparently badly beaten, and they all fled the Bell homestead. The ghost-witch focused her intentions increasingly on the Bell family patriarch, tormenting him into ill health and eventually poisoning him, making this particular ghost one of the only ones to actually kill someone. The whole story is incredible…and probably almost entirely fabricated by Martin Van Buren Ingram, who penned an account 45 years after the so-called haunting, based solely on a diary written by Bell’s son nearly 30 years after the fact. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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Richmond Vampire: In Richmond, Virginia’s Hollywood Cemetery there sits the mausoleum of one William Wortham Pool. Pool lived a fairly standard life, died at the age of 80, and was interred with his wife in the aforementioned mausoleum. After his death, though, that’s when the rumors started. Folks started saying that the W.W. Pool mausoleum was the home of a vampire. In 1925, a railroad tunnel collapsed nearby, trapping members of a repair crew inside. As rescuers tried to free the trapped men, a ghastly, bloody creature emerged from the rubble and ran toward the cemetery and into the Pool Mausoleum. Though people followed, no one could find it, and no one saw it leave the tomb. A rumor started that Pool was a vampire, and that it was W.W. himself who had been spotted that tragic night. The cemetery is very close to Virginia Commonwealth University, and the vampire rumors spread quickly among the students; the Pools’ bodies eventually had to be moved due to repeated vandalism.

However, the actual story of the 1925 cave-in didn’t need any vampires, ghouls, or other creatures to make it creepy. In truth, the man fleeing the rubble was Benjamin Mosby, who died shortly afterwards in a nearby hospital. A scary sight to be sure, but not necessarily hair-raising…except that when the townspeople eventually went back to unearth the rest of the collapse’s victims, they found only one corpse, leaving at least two laborers unaccounted for. The tunnel was boarded up, and they never recovered the rest of the bodies.

Illustrations Via: Ogres Vs. Trolls, FoukeMonster.Net, Newzbreaker, Kristy Heilenday

Derby Dapper

The supposed purpose of Derby might be horses, but aside from the two minutes of the day when we actually watch the ponies go around the track, most of our time and attention is spent on other matters. Derby, my friends, is really about the fashion — and the booze, but mostly the fashion. And it’s not surprising that some of our New York friends might be a little apprehensive about what exactly that entails. Our gentlemen pals especially seem to have some trouble when it comes to fully embracing their inner Southerner: Not everyone can pull off pastel-colored pants.

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Southern style brings up some very specific images to people: somewhere between Colonel Sanders and average LSU frat bro, a mix of Scarlett O’Hara and a Real Housewife of Atlanta. It’s a delicate balance, mixing the traditional with the contemporary, so it’s no wonder our poor Yankee buds are feeling overwhelmed.

But not to worry, Z&S is here for you! And rest assured you don’t have to dress head to toe in Lilly Pulitzer or Vineyard Vines (but, like, don’t let us stop you, if that’s your jam)in order to embrace the dapper spirit of Derby. Here, by special request, are some simple guidelines for the gentleman (also applicable to ladies in some cases),  to make dressing for Derby Day easier.

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1. Keep it simple. And by simple, we mean stay single-minded in your sartorial choices. It’s all about staying on theme. Whether that theme is mint green or maybe American flags. Go full seersucker if you want. But pick a lane, and commit to it.

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2. Brighter is better. I know New Yorkers have trouble with this — we love our blacks and our greys and our navy blues here — but Derby is a time to embrace color. A pop of coral here! A splash of marigold there! Gentleman, there are only so many times when bright blue pants are appropriate. Carpe chino, seize those slacks.

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3. Bowties are cool. For the dudes, and ladies, who want to achieve automatic dapperness, just slap on one of the Eleventh Doctor’s favorite accessories. And keep it classy: Avoid the clip on.

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4. Hat! Hat! Hat! The hat is the most important part of any Derby outfit. You can see Zelda’s post from last Friday for ideas for the lady types among you, but hats aren’t just for the girls! While we’re embracing our “Eliza Doolittle at Ascot” look, there are plenty of choices for the dudes: the boater,  the fedora, the homburg, etc. Embrace the hat, and learn your hat etiquette.

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5. Have fun. Seriously, guys, this is your one chance to wear those shorts with the lobsters on them, so just do it. Embrace your inner bro. We’ve all got one. Break out the Sperry’s and the seersucker, and don’t forget a pocket square to tie the whole outfit together! We’re all just here to get drunk and look fly while we do it. You are a classy ass dude, and you know it. All that’s left is to take the plunge.

Okay in all seriousness, I am not a fashion authority, and I am especially not a men’s fashion authority. But this is all in good fun! If you want an actual expert’s opinion on how to achieve peak Derby Fashion, this handy guide from Esquire is certainly helpful, as well as this one from The Art of Manliness. Suit up, and party on.

Photos Via: Kiel James Patrick, JAY KIJAI (TRUNK CLUBHADLEY COURT, GOORIN BROS, WELL-GROOMED

Your Complete Z&S Guide to All Things Derby

It’s here! It’s here! Derby week has officially arrived! We are bursting with excitement, buzzing with preparations, and more than a little homesick for our old Kentucky home. For those of you not lucky enough to be Louisvillians, this whole horse racing madness can seem a bit overwhelming, maybe even verging on crazy. But we here at Zelda and Scout are prepared to help. Let us be your Derby Spirit Guides. From stuff we wrote ourselves to favorite articles from around the internet, this is your class in all things Derby. From what to drink to how to bet, apparel to Zelda’s secret pie recipe and everything in between, this will have you celebrating with the best of them. Raise your julep cup high and listen for the call to the post. We’re almost home.

The Gist:

The Most Exciting Two Minutes in Infographics: A Visual Guide to Derby (Derby LLC)

The Fastest Two Weeks in Sports: Scout’s Thoughts on Derby Season

Next Year at Churchill: Scout on Oaks Day

Just Folks: Louisvillians on Derby

The Origin of Your Favorite Kentucky Derby Traditions (U.S. News)

My Old Kentucky Home (Official Kentucky Derby Website)

Director’s Cut: “The Kentucky Derby is Decadent and Depraved,” by Hunter S. Thompson (Grantland)

When the Sun Goes Down in the South: Zelda’s Thoughts on Downs After Dark (or, Horse Racing Doesn’t Just Happen in May)

Louisville:

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Louisville Skyline ($27 from Loose Petals)

Going to Derby? What to do in Louisville, Ky. (The New York Times, featuring a familiar face as their resident Ville expert!)

Beyond the Derby: Your Guide to Louisville, Kentucky (Travel and Leisure)

36 Hours in Louisville (The New York Times)

Betting and Horses:

Derby Days ($10 from Kentucky for Kentucky)

Derby Days ($10 from Kentucky for Kentucky)

How to Bet the Kentucky Derby (Garden and Gun)

Meet the 2016 Derby Field (The Courier-Journal)

Expert Picks: 2016 Oaks and Derby Favorites (Kentucky Derby Official Website)

Kentucky Derby Winner Hoping He Won’t Have To Repeat What Was Easily Most Traumatic Experience Of Life (The Onion)

Party:

Bourbon & Horses ($39 from The Old Try)

Bourbon & Horses ($39 from The Old Try)

Party Like a Louisvillian: The Ultimate Z&S Derby Party Hosting Guide

April 2015 Playlist: For Our Old Kentucky Home (or, Songs to Derby Party By)

Free Kentucky Derby Party Printables (Hostess with the Mostess)

Cocktails:

Classic Cocktails, Mint Julep by Michael Mullan ($35 from Groovy Gravy)

Classic Cocktails, Mint Julep by Michael Mullan ($35 from Groovy Gravy)

Bless Your Heart, New York. You Tried to Make a Mint Julep.  Love, Zelda

Our Talent Really Lies in Drinking: Scout’s Derby Cocktail Guide

Why We Drink Mint Juleps at the Kentucky Derby (PBS)

6 Southern Cocktails for Your Kentucky Derby Party (Town and Country)

Recipe: Maple Bacon Old Fashioned (Back Down South)

Recipe: Mint Julep Granita (Bluegrass Bites)

Recipe: Sweet Tea Bourbon Cocktails (Joy the Baker)

Food:

Let Them Eat Pie $20

Let Them Eat Pie ($20 from Ellolovey)

Chocolate Pecan Bourbony Goodness: How to Make Zelda’s Famous Pie

What’s Inside A ‘Derby Pie’? Maybe A Lawsuit Waiting To Happen (NPR)

Made in Louisville: Flavors Only Found in Derby City (USA Today)

Recipe: Kentucky Derby Pie Milkshake (Camille Styles)

Recipe: Fudgy Bourbon Balls (Smitten Kitchen)

Recipe: Baby Hot Browns (Southern Living)

Style:

Kentucky Derby Art Print ($40 from Rifle Paper Co.)

Kentucky Derby Art Print ($40 from Rifle Paper Co.)

Head-to-Toe Kentucky Derby Fashion Guide (Southern Living)

15 Derby Hats That Will Have You Ready to Run for the Roses: Zelda’s Picks from Fascinators to Floppy Straw

A Fashion Show on Fourth — All in the Name of Derby and Debauchery (Insider Louisville)

Kentucky Derby Dresses (Lou What Wear)

The World’s Most Epic Kentucky Fried Derby Hat (Kentucky for Kentucky)

When You’re Far Away:

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Decadent & Depraved (Unfortunately Sold out for this run from Kentucky for Kentucky)

Party Like It’s 1875! Our Guide to New York Derby Celebrations

Derby Day Beyond Churchill Downs (Garden and Gun)

I Miss Kentucky, Always. (The Bitter Southerner)